Last edited by Zurisar
Sunday, May 3, 2020 | History

6 edition of Nothing to hide the false tradeoff between privacy and security found in the catalog.

Nothing to hide the false tradeoff between privacy and security

  • 97 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Yale University Press in New Haven .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Law enforcement,
  • Law and legislation,
  • National security,
  • Right of Privacy

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementDaniel J. Solove
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsKF1262 .S65 2011
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24791940M
    ISBN 109780300172317
    LC Control Number2010049542


Share this book
You might also like
components of variability in volumetric distribution determination by stereophotogrammetry

components of variability in volumetric distribution determination by stereophotogrammetry

Palestine: problem and promise

Palestine: problem and promise

Paston Letters

Paston Letters

Perspective

Perspective

Boundary waters

Boundary waters

Crocodiles

Crocodiles

Employees organisations and their contribution to the development of vocational training policy in the European Community

Employees organisations and their contribution to the development of vocational training policy in the European Community

Team and individual motivation in collegiate basketball

Team and individual motivation in collegiate basketball

Mainland

Mainland

The rough guide to the Philippines

The rough guide to the Philippines

university teaching of social sciences

university teaching of social sciences

peculiar people and other foibles

peculiar people and other foibles

Immunoassay of gonadotrophins

Immunoassay of gonadotrophins

The everything paleolithic diet book

The everything paleolithic diet book

Ivan Vasilievich Kliun

Ivan Vasilievich Kliun

Nothing to hide the false tradeoff between privacy and security by Daniel J. Solove Download PDF EPUB FB2

In Nothing to Hide he skillfully dispels many of the myths associated with the faulty zero-sum tradeoff between privacy vs.

security. In exposing the flawed logic of having to forego one interest in order to secure another, Daniel Solove has done us all a great service."—Cited by: Nothing to Hide is a super fantastic, easy to read book about the argument between whether safety/security or privacy should be held in higher regard within society.

The book examines the laws, government agencies and social concerns of the argument and how the argument plays out in each context/5(14).

In Nothing to Hide he Nothing to hide the false tradeoff between privacy and security book dispels many of the myths associated with the faulty zero-sum tradeoff between privacy vs.

security. In exposing the flawed logic of having to forego one interest in order to secure another, Daniel Solove has done us all a great service.”.

In Nothing to Hide he skillfully dispels many of the myths associated with the faulty zero-sum tradeoff between privacy vs. security. In exposing the flawed logic of having to forego one Nothing to hide the false tradeoff between privacy and security book in order to secure another, Daniel Solove has done us all a great service."—.

Daniel J. Solove, NOTHING TO HIDE: THE FALSE TRADEOFF BETWEEN PRIVACY AND SECURITY, Chapter 1, Yale University Press, GWU Law School Public Law Research Paper No. GWU Legal Studies Research Paper No.

Cited by: TO HIDE: THE FALSE TRADEOFF BETWEEN PRIVACY AND SECURITY (Yale University Press, ). This Book Part is brought to you for free and open access by the Faculty Scholarship at Scholarly Commons. It hasAuthor: Daniel J. Solove. "If you've got nothing to hide," many people say, "you shouldn't worry about government surveillance." Others argue that we must sacrifice privacy for security.

But as Daniel J. Solove argues in this important book, these Nothing to hide the false tradeoff between privacy and security book and many others are flawed. They are based on mistaken views about what it means to protect privacy and the costs and benefits of doing so.

Get this from a library. Nothing to hide: the false tradeoff between privacy and security. [Daniel J Solove] -- "If you've got nothing to hide," many people say, "you shouldn't worry about government surveillance." Others argue that we must sacrifice privacy for security.

But as Daniel J. Solove argues in this. Succinctly and persuasively debunks the arguments that have contributed to privacy's demise, including the canard that if you have nothing to hide, you have nothing to fear from surveillanceDavid Cole, New York Review of Books [A] thought-provoking, accessible introduction to privacy and security lawJ.M.

Keller, Choice A very timely and thought provoking bookRaymond G. /5(16). The debate between privacy and security has been framed incorrectly, with the tradeoff between these values understood as an allor-nothing proposition.

But protecting privacy need not be fatal to security measures; it merely demands oversight and regulation.

The book reviews clearly indicate Nothing to hide the false tradeoff between privacy and security book, and this was not created to promote the book. I have been, and am including reviews that do point out shortcomings in the book. WhisperToMe25 June (UTC) The nominator said "Notability and no references are the main reasons I selected the article for speedy deletion.

All the references. a| The nothing-to-hide argument -- The all-or-nothing fallacy -- The danger of deference -- Why privacy isn't merely an individual right -- The pendulum argument -- The national-security argument -- The problem with dissolving the crime-espionage distinction -- The war-powers argument and the rule of law -- The Fourth Amendment and the secrecy paradigm -- The third.

The debate about the use of SOSTs is often framed as a trade-off between privacy and security concerns, although this is only one among several potential Author: Daniel Solove. As the computer-security specialist Schneier aptly notes, the nothing-to-hide argument stems from a faulty “premise that privacy is about hiding a wrong.” Surveillance, for example, can inhibit such lawful activities as free speech, free association, and other First Amendment rights essential for democracy.

The debate between privacy and security has been framed incorrectly as a zero-sum game in which we are forced to choose between one value and the other. Why can't we have both. In this concise and accessible book, Solove exposes the fallacies of many pro-security arguments that have skewed law and policy to favor security at the expense of privacy.

It is evident that even innocent citizens that have “nothing to hide” can be harmed in case the government demonstrates carelessness in the handling of information. Therefore, the “nothing to hide” argument that is presented by the government is inadequate once citizens understand the privacy concerns related to the accumulation of.

Nothing to Hide makes a powerful and compelling case for reaching a better balance between privacy and security and reveals why doing so is essential to protect our freedom and democracy.

This book grows out of an essay I wrote a few years ago about the Nothing-to-Hide Argument. "If you've got nothing to hide," many people say, "you shouldn't worry about government surveillance." Others argue that we must sacrifice privacy for security. But as Daniel J. Solove argues in this book, these arguments and many others are flawed.

They are based on mistaken views about what it means to protect privacy and the costs and benefits of doing : Daniel J. Solove. For him, privacy is a social good than which nothing greater can be conceived. And if you accept that premise, then his critique of the current security/privacy structure is both apt and convincing.

But like Anselm’s ontological argument for the existence of God, the foundational premise requires a leap of faith – and if you don’t accept. In his book Nothing to Hide: The False Tradeoff between Rolling out the extensive US history of the law and policy addressing privacy and security, the book presents a gradually expansive government power and its technological capabilities and how our privacy rights consequently got eroded.

Solove shows us this is not an option between. In Nothing to Hide he skillfully dispels many of the myths associated with the faulty zero-sum tradeoff between privacy vs. security. In exposing the flawed logic of having to forego one interest in order to secure another, Daniel Solove has done us all a great service."—5/5(1).

In Nothing to Hide he skillfully dispels many of the myths associated with the faulty zero-sum tradeoff between privacy vs.

security. In exposing the flawed logic of having to forego one interest in order to secure another, Daniel Solove has done us all a great service."—/5(16). NOTHING TO HIDE: THE FALSE TRADEOFF BETWEEN PRIVACY AND SECURITY especially the Fourth Amendment needs to be re-focused in a manner that will better protect privacy.

As readers might expect, the book deals almost exclusively with the U.S. Constitution, the case law thereon, and federal statutes. Solove argues that the choice is not.

Nothing to Hide: The False Tradeoff Between Privacy and Security: Solove, Daniel J.: : Libros/5(16). "If you've got nothing to hide," many people say, "you shouldn't worry about government surveillance." Others argue that we must sacrifice privacy for security.

But as Daniel J. Solove argues in this important book, these arguments and many others are flawed. They are based on mistaken views about what it means to protect privacy and the costs and. good people don't need privacy: if you've got nothing to hide, why worry about governments or businesses looking through your business.

Daniel J. Solove's new book, Nothing to Hide, shatters that myth. This book reaffirms the value of privacy, shows how endangered it. Nothing to hide: the false tradeoff between privacy and security / Daniel J. Solove. Format Book Published New Haven [Conn.]: Yale University Press, c Description ix, p.: ill.

; 25 cm. Notes Includes bibliographical references and index. Contents. The nothing-to-hide argument. dichotomies between privacy and security, and privacy and secrecy. Valuing your privacy should not raise suspicions that you have secrets to hide (a weakness often displayed by detectives and judges); but on the other hand, should not fyou all into.

That information technology has eroded privacy has been a common theme of the literature since the mid to late s. Time was when we could go about our daily business and enjoy considerable de facto privacy: No cameras would document our trip to or browsing in the department store; only a handful of people would notice us at by: 2.

Free 2-day shipping on qualified orders over $ Buy Nothing to Hide: The False Tradeoff between Privacy and Security at nd: Professor of Law Daniel J Solove. Why "security" keeps winning out over privacy The author of a new book on the privacy/security debate identifies five false arguments that erode personal freedom view in app.

The struggle between individual privacy and national security is often debated, and often the societal interest in security is seen to trump personal privacy. However, privacy should also be seen as a social value, one that need not always be at odds with security interests.

Read "Nothing to Hide: The False Tradeoff between Privacy and Security" by Daniel J. Solove available from Rakuten : Yale University Press. A provocative argument for stronger security protections and a vigorous attack on privacy.

The arguments against privacy are often glib and dismissive, but the book is worth reading for Baker’s extensive personal experience dealing with the issues.

The debate between privacy and security has been framed incorrectly as a zero-sum game in which we are forced to choose between one value and the other. Why can't we have both. In this concise and accessible book, Solove exposes the fallacies of many pro-security arguments that have skewed law and policy to favor security at the expense of privacy.

In Nothing to Hide he skillfully dispels many of the myths associated with the faulty zero-sum tradeoff between privacy vs. security. In exposing the flawed logic of having to forego one interest in order to secure another, Daniel Solove has done us all a great service."/5().